Deadly Divide Between Rich & Poor in Sydney

Deadly Divide Between Rich & Poor in Sydney

Death comes knocking three times more frequently in some Sydney suburbs than others and the disparity is increasing. Fewer than three in every thousand residents died in places such as Pymble, Pyrmont, Newport and Crows Nest last year. In the Rooty Hill to Minchinbury area, more than nine in a thousand died.

That is a higher standardised death rate than remote areas.

Australian National University demographer Dr Liz Allen said rising death rates point to "a serious policy issue" and are evidence of health inequalities.

Professor of Urban Planning at Western Sydney University Nicky Morrison said many people in the western suburbs have to be more car-orientated and sedentary because they commute longer distances to work or to go grocery shopping.

Western suburbs residents have two to three times greater rates of diabetes compared to people living in the east.

A "deepening" divide between "have and have not areas" is escalating as urban heat also takes a toll, Awais Piracha, Associate Professor of Urban Planning at Western Sydney University said.

McCrindle social researcher Geoff Brailey said urban sprawl is affecting western Sydney where people tend to be in more physically demanding work, may not be able to afford private health insurance or health care specialists and have to travel further for hospital care.

Read full article from The Sydney Morning Herald